Irvin Trujillo

Irvin Trujillo signature mark

Irvin Trujillo



*NEA National Heritage Fellow-2007*

*Museum Collections-Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Museum of American History, Museum of International Folk Art, Museum of Spanish Colonial Arts, Heard Museum, Albuquerque Museum, Taylor Museum, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Gene Autrey Museum, Museum of Man-Ontario, Canada*

*Spanish Market-Lifetime Achievement Award and 5 Grand Prize Awards*

As a seventh-generation Rio Grande weaver living in Chimayo, New Mexico, my work has evolved from the traditional styles of my forefathers. I use design ideas from historic Rio Grande weavings of Northern New Mexico and add my own aesthetic by combining old ideas with my own vision. My pieces may interpret my Hispanic history and culture, document events of the modern world, or make observations based on what is happening in my life. Most of my weavings develop spontaneously, as my father taught me. Executing an idea means discovering and overcoming the limitations imposed by traditional techniques and looms, and adopting, or perhaps changing, solutions as the weaving progresses. The binary logic of weaving makes the creative process and the execution of ideas inseparable. Not knowing the final outcome makes each weaving a journey.

Churro Series 2015 - 48x72 Chimayo blanket, handwoven wool
This type of handwoven wool blanket is commonly used as a wall hanging, or draped over the back of a couch. This piece has natural as a background color and red, natural black, and pecan included in its design. It uses hand dyed yarns, which means that these yarns were dyed by us using synthetic dyes, usually a washfast acid dye. It was woven using churro wool by Irvin Trujillo who is a seventh-generation weaver, 2007 NEA National Heritage Fellow, and recurring Spanish Market top award winner. It measures approximately 48 by 72 inches.
 
This finely detailed and highly colorful piece combines defining aspects of all of our primary Rio Grande styles, Saltillo, Vallero, Chimayo and Rio Grande stripes. It also draws from a variety of spiritual symbols inviting your own personal interpretation. It is woven of hand dyed and natural dyed merino wool and silk blen yarns with some real gold thread.
Emergence in Tunisia - 48x84 Chimayo blanket, handwoven wool
Irvin named this piece in honor of the changes going on in Tunisia that happened while he was weaving it. He had woven a piece years ago that drew from an ancient Tunisian mosaic, so I think that perhaps Irvin feels a tie to this faraway country he has never visited. This piece is an example of two widths sewn together to make a blanket. The dyes are natural indigo blues, acid dye for the red and brown, and natural white. The piece is made of 50-50 merino silk from Sweden. It also has some metallic gold thread. The scalloped circle is found in Saltillo serapes from the 18th century. This formal design structure is very much in keeping with the tradition of Saltillo weaving. Irvin Trujillo is a seventh-generation weaver, 2007 NEA National Heritage Fellow, and recurring Spanish Market top award winner. The piece measures approximately 48 by 84 inches.
Gold Circle - Handmade Wool Weaving
Gold Circle by Irvin Trujillo is very much true to the historic Saltillo serapes. The scalloped circle is reminiscent of some of the classic 17th century Mexican Saltillos. This piece uses richly-colored, hand-dyed merino wool and silk blend yarns acid dyed by Irvin and a gold metallic yarn to give it a bit of a discreet sparkle. This is much finer than most of what we do, with a weft count of 64 (as opposed to the normal 26), but it uses the usual 8 ends or inch of Chimayo blankets. It measures approximately 48 by 88 inches.
Grace - 54x84 Chimayo blanket, handwoven wool
Grace is one the very finely detailed pieces by Irvin. This piece is a Trampas Vallero style because it has the four eight pointed stars in the corners and one star in the center. He has added a lot of interesting details that make it a pleasure to look at, there are just so many lovely variations of color and pattern. Most of it is geometric pattern, but there are flowers, and there is a hamsa in it, and even flames. It is made of acid dyed merino-silk and gold metallic thread. This is much finer than most of what we do, with a weft count of 64 (as opposed to the normal 26), but it uses the usual 8 ends or inch of Chimayo blankets. The size is similar to blankets in the 1800s.
Mountains and Streams - Handmade Wool Weaving
This piece is part of a cluster series. This series was begun several years ago when Irvin participated in a tapestry exhibit that required a slightly smaller format than he normally weaves. This piece has red, orange, kelly green, jade, peacock,turquoise, and navy included in its design. It uses mixed dyes, which means that at least some of these yarns are from natural dyes, and some of these yarns were hand dyed or commercially dyed. It was woven by Irvin Trujillo who is a seventh-generation weaver, 2007 NEA National Heritage Fellow, and recurring Spanish Market top award winner. It measures approximately 48 by 30 inches and comes prepared for hanging on the wall.
Ode to JOT - 48x72 Chimayo blanket, handwoven wool
Irvin recently came across an image of a Chimayo he had not seen before by his father Jacobo O. Trujillo (JOT) and decided to copy it... though colors are different and design is not a precise match. Jacobo was also a well-known weaver and taught Irvin to weave starting at age 10 yrs. By duplicating the piece, Irvin was able to understand how his father's logic worked in creating the design and he really wanted to preserve this logic as much as the design itself. This weaving is the result. This piece has indigo as a background color and gold, light green, rust. Light orange, and burgundy included in its design. It uses mixed dyes, which means that at least some of these yarns are from natural dyes, and some of these yarns were hand dyed or commercially dyed. It was woven by Irvin Trujillo who is a seventh-generation weaver, 2007 NEA National Heritage Fellow, and recurring Spanish Market top award winner. It measures approximately 48 by 72 inches.
Profile - 48x72 Chimayo blanket, handwoven wool
The interlaced profiles in this weaving are of us, the weavers of Centinela. It is Irvin, LIsa, and Jake Trujillo, father to Irvin. It is very traditional in some ways, mainly the vertical border and the center diamond. But the work before and after the center diamond, as well as the use of circles, is a touch that Irvin brings new to this piece. This type of handwoven wool blanket is commonly used as a wall hanging, or draped over the back of a couch. This piece has natural dyed blue as a background color and rusts, reds, tans, light browns, greens, natural included in its design. It uses natural dyes, which means that yarn in this piece uses dyes that were obtained from flowers, leaves, wood, or insects. It was woven by Irvin Trujillo who is a seventh-generation weaver, 2007 NEA National Heritage Fellow, and recurring Spanish Market top award winner. It measures approximately 48 by 72 inches.
Yo Soy Viejito - 48x72 Chimayo blanket, handwoven wool
This type of handwoven wool blanket is commonly used as a wall hanging, or draped over the back of a couch. This piece has natural black as a background color and indigo blue and natural included in its design. It uses natural dyes, which means that yarn in this piece uses dyes that were obtained from flowers, leaves, wood, or insects. It was woven by Irvin Trujillo who is a seventh-generation weaver, 2007 NEA National Heritage Fellow, and recurring Spanish Market top award winner. It measures approximately 48 by 72 inches.
La Pinata - 54x84 Chimayo blanket, handwoven wool
This festive piece incorporates elements of Saltillo, Vallero, Rio Grande, and Chimayo design. Interpreting timeless wisdom, embodied here by ancient spiritual symbols, requires fresh engagment by new generations, as do our weaving traditions. It is woven of a merino wool and silk blend, using cream as a background color, with browns, reds, blues, golds, purples, orange, and black included in its design. It uses mixed dyes, meaning that some of these yarns are from natural dyes, and some of these yarns were hand dyed. It was woven by Irvin Trujillo who is a seventh-generation weaver, 2007 NEA National Heritage Fellow, and recurring Spanish Market top award winner. It measures approximately 54 by 84 inches.
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